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Saturday, July 20, 2013

MY LOW-FAT VEGAN MAYO WITH NO EXTRACTED OIL-- CREAMY GOODNESS FOR MAYO LOVERS + A LITTLE HISTORY

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This is a newly revised version of my low-fat vegan mayo recipe that appears in several of my cookbooks including my newest one, "World Vegan Feast", and elsewhere on this blog. I have used, and refined, this recipe for years because I am a mayonnaise lover.  When I use it, I like to slather it on liberally! Hence, my preoccupation with a very lowfat vegan version of it that comes up to my taste standards. Of course, as a baby vegan, I tried those recipes where you blended a stream of oil into some soymilk (which contains lecithin, an emulsifier, as egg yolks do).  They usually worked well, but were just as high in fat and calories as the original. So, for years I made tofu mayonnaise, and I still like it, but my husband never really did, and silken tofu, the main ingredient, makes it more expensive. We both prefer this recipe, and it is very inexpensive.  Four Hellman's fans of my acquaintance loved this (and were surprised that they did). It’s smooth and creamy, and just tangy enough.

This recipe is a child of an old-fashioned salad dressing recipe, called a "Boiled Dressing" (a bit of a misnomer, since it was actually cooked gently in the top of a double boiler). "Boiled Dressing" was made with ingredients available to common people or farm folks, who did not have access to, or could not afford, vegetable oil.  Olive oil was not available to any but the wealthy until the late 19th century, so only they could enjoy vinaigrette and oil-based mayonnaise. Oil-based mayonnaise was not available commercially in the USA until 1907, when Mrs. Schlorer's mayonnaise hit the shelves in Philadelphia. I looked it up and it is still available! Hellman's followed in 1912.


"Boiled dressing" would usually contain a tablespoon or two of butter, and the water, milk or cream (or a combination) base would be thickened with flour or cornstarch and an egg yolk or two. Sometimes it contained a bit of sugar (especially when used on coleslaw) and sometimes not.  (I suspect that the sweeter type is the prototype for Miracle Whip.)

You will find recipes for "Boiled dressing" or "Cooked Salad Dressing" in early North American cookbooks, and in some Southern and Mid-Western cookbooks.  I started out by veganizing a recipe in a Mennonite cookbook called the "More-with-Less Cookbook" (first published in 1979), and refined it over time.

As you might deduce, I'm forever trying to improve upon this recipe. This time, even though it is already a very low-fat recipe, with just enough oil to make it pleasantly creamy, I was trying to revise it for those who do not eat ANY extracted oils. I decided to try using raw cashews, measure-for-measure, instead of oil. A few whole nuts are allowed in some versions of a no-oil vegan diet, so I thought I'd give it a go. (See the calorie comparisons in the introductory text in the recipe below.)

It worked beautifully-- beyond my expectations, actually. It is very creamy and I didn't even have to add the tiny bit of guar or xanthan gum that I usually do as a stabilizer when I use oil. (It has held up well in the refrigerator for about a week and a half so far. Without the vegetable gum, the oil version tends to get a bit runny after a while.)  I will make it this way from now on, unless I run out of raw cashews!

For those who are allergic to soy, prefer not to use oil, do not like tofu mayonnaise, or the commercial "light" mayos (most are not vegan, anyway), this is a delicious (and inexpensive) solution.

I can't stress enough that this recipe is EASY TO MAKE and takes only a few minutes of your time!  You will save money and calories.  And you can use the type of nondairy milk that suits you. (I've used hemp milk with good result, BTW.)


Printable Recipe

BRYANNA’S CREAMY LOW-FAT VEGAN MAYONNAISE WITH NO EXTRACTED OIL (can be soy-free)
Servings: 32;  Yield: about 2 cups
There are about 90 calories in a tablespoon of regular non-vegan mayo and also in Vegenaise Original or Earth Balance Mindful Mayo. There are 45 calories per tablespoon in Vegenaise Reduced-Fat, 35 in Spectrum Eggless Light Canola Mayo, but only 12 calories per tablespoon in this mayo-- so you can indulge yourself!  NOTE: This was calculated using my homemade soymilk, but I calculated it (with Living Cookbook software) using various nondairy milks and they were all in this range-- except when made with canned full-fat coconut milk, which resulted in a count of  35 calories per tablespoon.

NOTE: If you are allergic to nuts, use my original recipe here.  You can see photos of the process there, too.

Ingredients:
Mix A:
1 cup any non-dairy milk (except canned full-fat coconut milk) you like to drink, Original type-- doesn't have to be unsweetened 
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar (my favorite), plain rice vinegar, white wine vinegar, or lemon juice
1 1/2  teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard (mustard powder)
1/4 cup raw cashews, soaked in boiling water for 10 minutes and drained
OPTIONAL (for a slightly "eggier" flavor): 1 tsp. The VEGG powder (vegan egg yolk sub)
Mix B:
10 tablespoons cold water (1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons)
1/2 teaspoon agar powder (NOT flakes)
3 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch (or use wheat starch--do not substitute other starches! You can buy organic cornstarch in health food stores and online.)

NOTE BEFORE YOU START: This mayo does not thicken as you blend it, like egg mayonnaise or soy mayonnaise made with lots of oil, so don’t blend it and blend it, thinking it will thicken as it blends-- it won’t!! It will thicken in a few hours in the refrigerator.

Instructions:
Place the Mix A ingredients into your blender jar and have ready. In a small saucepan or microwave-proof bowl, mix together the water and agar from Mix B, and let sit for a few of minutes. Add the cornstarch and whisk well.

If making in the saucepan on the stovetop, stir constantly over high heat until thick and translucent-- not chalky white. OR: Microwave option (my preference): Use the microwave-proof bowl for the mixture, and microwave on 100% power for 30 seconds. Whisk. Repeat this about three times, or until thick and translucent- not chalky white. (The microwave works very well with cornstarch mixtures, BTW.) Be sure to scrape the bottom of the pot or bowl with a spoon or spatula, so that no cornstarch gets left at the bottom. NOTE: If you don't cook this thoroughly (and "translucent" is the key word), the mayo won't thicken properly.

Scrape the cooked Mix B into the blender (using a spatula so that you get as much of it as you can out of the bowl or pot) containing Mix A. Blend until the mixture is very white and frothy and emulsified,

Pour the mayo into a clean pint (2 cup) jar (there may be a little bit over, which you can pour into a tiny jar or sample cup), cover and refrigerate for several hours, until it is set. It should be firm enough to stand a knife up in. Keep refrigerated. It will keep for about 2 weeks.

MISO MAYO VARIATION: Omit the salt and add 3 tablespoons white miso.

ANOTHER VARIATION: Do you prefer a Miracle Whip-type spread to mayonnaise? Try this:
Use 3/4 to 1 teaspoon mustard powder and add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and 1 tablespoon organic sugar or agave nectar to the recipe (sugar levels in this type of recipe vary, so start with this and then let your taste dictate).

For more variations see this blog post.

Nutrition Facts
Nutrition (per tablespoon):
12.0 calories; 42% calories from fat; 0.6g total fat; 0.0mg cholesterol; 92.6mg sodium; 9.1mg potassium; 1.4g carbohydrates; 0.1g fiber; 0.2g sugar; 1.4g net carbs; 0.4g protein; 0.3 points.


Cooking Tips
1.) This mayonnaise, with the addition of herbs, garlic, etc., can be used as a savory vegetable and toast topping.

2.) If you leave out the agar in the basic recipe, this makes a good base for cold savory sauces.

Enjoy!



8 comments:

in2insight said...

So simple to whip together and with such good results!
How do you come up with these?!? :)
One note, and it's no doubt a personal taste thing, but I'd recommend using UN-sweetened "milk".
Potato salad, get ready!

Rio said...

Oh, I too love mayonnaise but use it rarely. My favourite is Vegenaise but since I use it rarely I often have to through out half an expired jar which I don't like doing. I'm so going to make this recipe tonight and try it on my salad. Thank you for sharing!

Jill, The Veggie Queen said...

You are absolutely amazing in how you truly work on a recipe to perfect it. You are my "vegan heroine".

I never tire of your amazing recipes. Keep up the great work.

Bryanna Clark Grogan said...

Thanks so much, Jill-- that means alot to me!

judy said...

I'd like to say thank you for this wonderful recipe. I live in Hungary and there is no Vegenaise and I have to make everything from scracth.I like all your recipes but this one is a lifesaver for me as I cannot eat margarin or any other fatty stuffs.
I use it for cucumber sandwiches and they are awesome. Thanks Brianna for sharing it.

judy said...

Bryanna, this recipe is a "lifesaver"
for me as I live in Hungary and there is no Vegenaise and I have to make everything from scratch. I made wonderful cucumber sandwiches using this mayo they were excellent. I love your recipes because they are tasty but low-fat so a person like me on a low-fat vegan diet is very happy with them. thanks for saring and keep up the good work, we are grateful for it.

Tiffiny said...

Awesome!

Grace Carrin said...

I love Hellmann's mayo - there is no other. But I would rather give up the mayo altogether than to use Veganaise. It does not taste ANYTHING like Hellmann's. I so love mayo so I try every recipe I find looking for the perfect one. Yours looks like it has the consistency of Hellmann's so I am anxious to try it. I need more cashews and of course, as usual I have agar flakes so I have to get powder. (When they serve soup I always come with a fork). Since becoming vegan I haven't had a good cucumber sandwich, so hoping this works. Will let you know - you haven't failed me yet! :)